williamhereford:

6am in Nagano…  I shot these all within 1 block of each other on the same street while traveling on assignment last month through Japan.  
williamhereford:

6am in Nagano…  I shot these all within 1 block of each other on the same street while traveling on assignment last month through Japan.  
williamhereford:

6am in Nagano…  I shot these all within 1 block of each other on the same street while traveling on assignment last month through Japan.  
williamhereford:

6am in Nagano…  I shot these all within 1 block of each other on the same street while traveling on assignment last month through Japan.  

williamhereford:

6am in Nagano…  I shot these all within 1 block of each other on the same street while traveling on assignment last month through Japan.  

(via artvevo)

blackpaint20:

Edvard Munch

On the Waves of Love

(via gh2u)

“It seems to me that the desire to make art produces an ongoing experience of longing, a restlessness sometimes, but not inevitably, played out romantically, or sexually. Always there seems something ahead, the next poem or story, visible, at least, apprehensible, but unreachable. To perceive it at all is to be haunted by it; some sound, some tone, becomes a torment – the poem embodying that sound seems to exist somewhere already finished. It’s like a lighthouse, except that, as one swims towards it, it backs away.”
— Louise Glück, Proofs & Theories: Essays on Poetry (with thanks to Whiskey River)

(via cvltivate)

nevver:

Andrew Archer
nevver:

Andrew Archer
nevver:

Andrew Archer
nevver:

Andrew Archer
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!
angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!

angrywomenofcolorunited:

Coincidentally, about two weeks ago or so I did a presentation for a group at my school about the experiences of Arab-Americans and thought I’d just share the powerpoint I made that generally outlines the topics I talked about. If you have any specific questions, I’d be glad to answer them!

(via hollow-gram)

“Some periods of our growth are so confusing that we don’t even recognize that growth is happening. We may feel hostile or angry or weepy and hysterical, or we may feel depressed. It would never occur to us, unless we stumbled on a book or a person who explained to us, that we were in fact in the process of change, of actually becoming larger, spiritually, than we were before. Whenever we grow, we tend to feel it, as a young seed must feel the weight and inertia of the earth as it seeks to break out of its shell on its way to becoming a plant. Often the feeling is anything but pleasant. But what is most unpleasant is the not knowing what is happening […] Those long periods when something inside ourselves seems to be waiting, holding its breath, unsure about what the next step should be, eventually become the periods we wait for, for it is in those periods that we realize that we are being prepared for the next phase of our life and that, in all probability, a new level of the personality is about to be revealed.”
Alice Walker  (via artistsuffer)

(via artistsuffer)

nevver:

Ken Lum
nevver:

Ken Lum
nevver:

Ken Lum
descroissants:

Impressionistic Cinema: Wonderland (Micheal Winterbottom, 1999)
descroissants:

Impressionistic Cinema: Wonderland (Micheal Winterbottom, 1999)
descroissants:

Impressionistic Cinema: Wonderland (Micheal Winterbottom, 1999)

descroissants:

Impressionistic Cinema: Wonderland (Micheal Winterbottom, 1999)

(via blua)

“White supremacy has taught him that all people of color are threats irrespective of their behavior. Capitalism has taught him that, at all costs, his property can and must be protected. Patriarchy has taught him that his masculinity has to be proved by the willingness to conquer fear through aggression; that it would be unmanly to ask questions before taking action. Mass media then brings us the news of this in a newspeak manner that sounds almost jocular and celebratory, as though no tragedy has happened, as though the sacrifice of a young life was necessary to uphold property values and white patriarchal honor. Viewers are encouraged feel sympathy for the white male home owner who made a mistake. The fact that this mistake led to the violent death of an innocent young man does not register; the narrative is worded in a manner that encourages viewers to identify with the one who made the mistake by doing what we are led to feel we might all do to “protect our property at all costs from any sense of perceived threat. ” This is what the worship of death looks like.”
— Bell Hooks (Trayvon)

(via barbieprivilege)

character surveys for anyone who wants to flesh out characters:

WHITE RAPPER FAQ Part 2

aamerrahman:

image

This is a follow up to this post here: http://aamerrahman.tumblr.com/post/53978736048/white-rapper-faq

1. ARE YOU SAYING WHITE PEOPLE CAN’T LISTEN TO RAP?

Stop projecting your anxieties onto me.  You’re white.  You can do pretty much whatever you want. It’s a sweet deal.

2. If someone loves a culture like hip-hop, aren’t they allowed to be part of it?  Blackface was about mockery.  White rappers love Hip-Hop, that’s why they make RAP MUSIC.

Blackface wasn’t just about mockery.  It was an industry, a structured form of entertainment that allowed white people to benefit from their projections of black culture.  A key element was the ability to define blackness to a white audience and profit from this performance.  This whole issue is as much about the economic dimensions of white rap and its relationship to an audience as it is about the basic intentions behind it.

A white rapper like Iggy Azalea acts out signifiers which the white majority associates with black culture - hyper sexuality, senseless materialism, an obsession with drugs, money and alcohol – as well as adopting clothing, speech and music – as a costume that they can put on and discard at will.  It’s a cheap circus act.

3. WHY ARE YOU BLAMING THESE WHITE ARTISTS FOR BEHAVIOUR THAT IS REGULARLY CELEBRATED BY BLACK ARTISTS?

Supply only exists to meet demand.  In fact, the hyper-sexual,  materialist and misogynist trends we see in mainstream rap are a manifestation of the desires and imagination of a majority white consumer base.  In other words, these are the images of blackness white people want to see being reproduced for their entertainment and consumption.

This white fanbase has demanded increasingly fetishised images of black and brown people for almost 3 decades now - I mean seriously, I recently heard two white radio hosts (a man and a woman) discussing how much they wanted to touch Nicki Minaj’s ass to see whether it was real or not.  Like some kind of modern day Hottentot Venus.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venus_hottentot).

But while they are fundamental part of the shaping of commercial rap and its problematic imagery, white people take none of the blame.  The economic structure of the music industry dictates that black people do not control the production of rap music, but must simultaneously be held accountable for its problems and answer for all of its shortcomings.

3. Why is it ok for an artist like Scribe (from New Zealand) to rhyme in an American accent but not someone like Iggy Azalea?  The only difference is that Iggy is white and Scribe is not.

Scribe and Iggy Azalea are not simply ‘different’ because of the colour of their skin.  Race is not just some cosmetic difference between people.   In this case it is the door to a discussion about class, history and culture.

Hip-hop was created and pioneered by people who had directly suffered colonisation, slavery, intergenerational poverty, criminalisation, drug epidemics, racial profiling, demonisation by media, over-policing and mass imprisonment.  Hip-hop has always naturally resonated with people around the world who have experienced similar things – just look at the rise of Arab/ Muslim Hip-Hop in the last decade (and across the 3rd World in general).

Scribe has actually grown up in a community directly affected by racism and poverty.  His American accent is in no way the type of appropriation being exercised by someone like Iggy Azalea, who basically impersonates her idea of a poor black woman for fun.

5. SO…

So if you participate in a culture built heavily on people’s experiences of racism but you have never experienced racism yourself, tread lightly.  Basically, everyone take a page out of Brother Ali’s book.  Last time I saw him live, he took a whole chunk out of his show to genuinely talk to the mostly white crowd about privilege, racism, colonialism and their part in it.  If you simply take from a culture without giving back to its legacy, or at least consistently acknowledging the people who pioneered it, you are a thief.

This ‘post-racial’ and ‘colour-blind’ idea that Hip-Hop ‘belongs to nobody,’ that ‘anyone can rap’ with no strings attached is basically to deny and delete the history of a culture.   Only an incredible sense of arrogance and white entitlement could lead someone to the conclusion that Hip-Hop’s roots as a rejection of violent oppression and racism are suddenly irrelevant, especially when those conditions still exist today.

6. YOU CALLED YOUR POST ‘WHITE RAPPERS FAQ.’ DID YOU REALLY MEAN ALL WHITE RAPPERS? WHAT ABOUT MACKLEMORE/ AESOP ROCK/ (INSERT CONSCIOUS WHITE RAPPER HERE)?

My first post was specifically about artists like Iggy Azalea and Kreashawn.  Of course there has always been a spectrum of white artists in Hip-Hop who engage with the art differently with different levels of respect and self-awareness (see Brother Ali above).  However, simply being conscious does not give you immunity to criticism or the right for people to question your presence and intent.  Regardless of how ‘conscious’ a white rapper might be, all the points in (2), (3), (4) and (5) still apply.

Also, for everyone who keeps screaming ‘Macklemore!’ at me, please explain this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H83YWalKuKc

7. WHAT ABOUT EMINEM?

I specifically didn’t talk about Eminem because Harry Allen (Public Enemy’s one time ‘Director of Enemy Relations’) wrote this amazing piece in The Source 10 years ago:

http://www.harryallen.info/docs/TheUnbearableWhitenessofEmceeing.pdf

Everything in that article is still 100% relevant and true, and yes - Eminem opened the door for all of this.

8. RE: Fallon/ Timberlake ‘history of rap’ - Oh, so you’re saying that Black Thought and Questlove are too stupid to know that they are part of a minstrel show?

No, I’m saying that capitalism means people have bills to pay and they end up in compromised positions.  It also means that talentless people are regularly rewarded over those with genuine ability.  So instead of being truly celebrated as a genius and being able to program his own 24-hour  music network, a pioneer like Questlove has to play drums on Jimmy Fallon’s show five nights a week.

Imagine how much smarter your kids would be if they grew up watching  Questlove TV instead of MTV.

(via whatwhiteswillneverknow)